Michele Sennesael

was born in Ghent, Belgium, 1974.

After completing her studies as a photographer and earning a bachelor of Communication and Media, she worked eight years in Belgium, France, The Netherlands and Spain as an IT specialist for Volvo Europa Trucks. The need to follow her passion and to give a greater meaning and purpose to her live, forced her to quit this career and started working as a photo editor for the biggest Belgian newspaper. In 2010, the earthquake in Haiti inspired her to give up this steady job and came up with the idea of running photography workshops for street kids in Nicaragua. Between 2011 and 2014, she travelled frequently to Nicaragua and founded the Heroes project. A project, focusing on the everyday life of street children (Heroes) and poor families (Stories of Love, Faith and Courage) created to fund a local organization ‘Las Hormiguitas’ in Nicaragua. In Belgium, she organized lectures and exhibitions in public spaces, to raise awareness on social contemporary issues and to discuss a more general thematic. After capital life changes at the end of 2015, she moved to New York. Documenting a home birth in Brooklyn inspired her to start the long-term project ‘Old traditions and new rituals’ on the evolution of reproductive and maternal health in Central America. This project pushed her again to move towards new directions.

Michele currently studies Electronic Integrated Arts at Alfred University’s (Alfred, New York), MFA program.

statement

Looking beyond the obvious, I am driven by the desire to explore the nature of my subject, through the imaginary. My work as a visual artist is an examination of different shields and the thinking that lies behind it. As the outcome is secondary to the process, the process supplies me many questions I never looked for. Through this process of decontextualizing, I reconstruct and define what medium matches best in order to my creations. I am interested in creating an atmosphere beyond the distraction of the ordinary, that captures them uniqueness of the subject.